Sunday, February 28, 2010

CFP: Read Feather Journal (June 1)

Of possible interest...
Call for submissions to

Red Feather Journal

Red Feather Journal invites critical and/or theoretical examination of the child image to further our understanding of the consumption, circulation, and representation of the child throughout the world’s visual mediums. Red Feather Journal welcomes submissions that examine the child image from a broad range of media’s: children’s film, Hollywood film, international film, television images of children or childhood, child images on the Internet, images of children/childhood in art, or images of children/childhood in any other visual medium. Some sample topics include, but are certainly not limited to: studies of images of children of color; child as commodity; images of children in Africa, Asia, Middle East, South America, etc.; political uses of the child image; children in film; children in advertising; visual adaptations of children’s literary works; child welfare images; children and war; or any other critical examination of the child image in a variety of visual mediums.

Red Feather Journal is a peer-reviewed journal that facilitates an international dialogue among scholars and professionals through vigorous discussion of the intersections between the child image and the conception of childhood, children’s material culture, children and politics, the child body, and any other conceptions of the child within local, national, and global contexts.

Red Feather Journal is published twice a year, February and September, and adheres to the MLA citation system. Authors are welcome to submit articles in other citation systems, with the understanding that, upon acceptance, conversion to MLA is a condition of publication. For more information, please refer to our website:

Interested contributors please submit the paper, an abstract, and a brief 50-word biography as attachments (Microsoft Word compatible) to

Deadline for submissions for the fall issue is June 1st, 2010.

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Sunday, February 21, 2010

CFP: Contemporary Comics (March 25; May 21)

artists, current themes and contexts

University of Copenhagen, Denmark
21 May 2010

This academic conference is presented in collaboration with Copenhagen's comics biennial, the international comics festival in Øksnehallen, Copenhagen, 22-23 May.

As an independent part of the festival's programme, it aims to present the status of international research in contemporary comics both to an academic and a general audience, and will form part of a broader range of programming in the city in the days surrounding the festival, celebrating comics and comics culture.

Contributions might be within the following subjects, but we welcome other suggestions:
  • Comics / politics / society
  • Aesthetic movements
  • Contemporary artists: mainstream and independent
  • Publication platforms: from book publishing to the internet
  • The future of comics
Presentations will be 20 minutes long. Speakers will be given free pass to the festival and access to the Friday night VIP award show. Confirmed artists are: Dave Gibbons, Chris Ware, Daniel Clowes, Charles Burns and Frank Quitely. The festival's programme is available at An artist's talk involving one or more of the visiting artists is being planned, so contributions about or including works of the above mentioned artists will be given priority.

Abstracts of approximately 250 words and a short biographical text of maximum 100 words should be sent by 25 March to Rikke Platz Cortsen at along with any general enquiries.

Please visit our website at: which will be updated regularly.

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Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Call for Papers: 'Surrealism, Science Fiction, and Comic Books' (n.d.; 1/22/11)

Call for Papers:
'Surrealism, Science Fiction,
and Comic Books'

The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
22 January 2011

In his 1976 essay ‘Science Fiction and Allied Literature,’ David Ketterer wrote ‘it is rather surprising that the considerable affinity which exists between Surrealism and SF has not attracted more attention.’ This observation was repeated in 1997 by Roger Bozzetto and Arthur B. Evans, who lamented that the relations between Surrealism and science fiction ‘continue to be largely unexplored in SF scholarship,’ and that ‘there currently exists no in-depth study of SF and Surrealism.’ The points of contact and areas of overlap, along with the influences, differences, and antagonisms that lie between Surrealism, science fiction, and the related literature of the comic book will be explored in this conference to be held 22 January 2011 at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Such observations take on extra force when we consider Surrealism’s historical context, along with its literary and pictorial culture. Emerging in France between the two world wars, it was well positioned to receive the writings of Jules Verne and H. G. Wells that initiated and defined the genre boundaries of early science fiction, along with the popularisation of the fourth dimension and the advent of the Theory of Relativity that such literature drew upon, whilst the writings of Alfred Jarry, Franz Kafka, and Raymond Roussel gave them a related comic, absurd, or fantastic perspective on the machine and technology. Indeed, Roussel’s boundless admiration for Verne was equalled by the similar veneration felt for Roussel by Marcel Duchamp and Roberto Matta, expressed in their art between 1912 and the 1940s. Furthermore, one of the most important figures in early French SF (and now almost forgotten), Jacques Spitz, was close to the Surrealists in the 1930s, and his books of the interwar years show a marked Surrealist tendency. In the 1940s, Matta’s work was affected more specifically by the worlds described in science fiction and also by comic books, which were a significant discovery for André Breton and the Surrealists in New York. Important to René Magritte’s art in the 1940s, comic books were also a key popular form for postwar Surrealism in Europe and America.

Because barely any scholarship exists on how far the art and writings of Surrealists in the forties and since were affected by SF and comic books, it is expected that postwar art and writings will form a significant strand of this conference (for instance, the writings of Malcolm de Chazal were described by their English translator as ‘science fictions’), as will the investigation of how the project to expand reality proposed by Surrealism in its imagery and poetry was extended by important SF writers such as Stanislaw Lem and J.G. Ballard, as well as for related novelists like Jorge Luis Borges, Alan Burns, and Thomas Pynchon.

Potential areas of exploration are:
  • Surrealism, SF, and the imagery of spiritualism
  • The comic book as a subversive accomplice of Surrealism
  • Surrealism, physics, and fiction
  • The spaces of Surrealist painting and the SF imagination
  • Legacies of Surrealism in contemporary comic books
  • The fourth dimension in Surrealism, modernism, and SF
  • Surrealist and SF geographies
  • The Gothic imagination in Surrealism, SF, and comics
  • Futurity in Surrealism and SF
  • SF and Surrealism in the postmodern novel
Paper proposals of about 250 words should be sent to

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Monday, February 08, 2010

CFP: Phoenix Comicon Comic Art Conference (3/30; 5/27-30)

Call for papers

The Phoenix Comicon is sponsoring a comic art conference in conjunction with its programming from May 27-30, 2010. Based on participant interest, we are expanding the scope of the comics conference to include broader areas of comics scholarship.

We are seeking papers for presentations from academics, teachers, artists, retailers, and others who engage comics on either a practical or scholarly level. The conference will feature a number of themes, and respondents are encouraged to pitch their own ideas or propose a panel discussion.

Technology and the comics: Futures and Resistance
  • Critical approaches to and innovations in web comics
  • The shift from traditional illustration and distribution methods to digital methods
  • Applications and analysis of “infinite canvas” texts
  • Constrained comics and other resistance authors/artists
Comic culture in the 21st century
  • Changes in how we sell, collect, and consume comics
  • Scanlations and manga
  • Teaching comics
  • Cosplay and costuming
Media blending
  • Video games and comics
  • Movie and other adaptations
  • Motion comics and other web-based media
Respondents are encouraged to expand on this list in shaping their proposals. Respondents are also encouraged to pitch alternate panels.

Graduate students, artists, writers, industry professionals, independent scholars, and academics are all encouraged to submit. We envision our panels as representing a variety of perspectives geared toward the broad audience of the Phoenix Comicon. Panels will last for one hour. Presenters will be asked to make a short presentation, followed by a moderated panel round table and a Q and A session with the audience. Presentations integrating audio and visuals are recommended. Please note any A/V needs along with your proposal.

Please submit a 300-500 word proposal to Dr. Kathleen Dunley at by March 30, 2010. Proposals will go through a peer review process and those accepted will be notified via email.

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Wednesday, February 03, 2010

ImageText 5.1 Published

The new issue of ImageText, the journal about comics from the University of Florida, was just published. Here's the homepage for this issue. Contents include:


Graphic Whiteness and the Lessons of Chris Ware’s Jimmy CorriganJuda Bennett and Cassandra Jackson
Watchmen: The Graphic Novel as Trauma FictionBrandy Ball Blake
The Confluence of Heroism, Sissyhood, and Camp in The Rawhide Kid: Slap LeatherFrank Bramlett
"To the Stables, Robin": Regenerating the Frontier in Frank Miller's Batman: The Dark Knight ReturnsTheo Finigan
Breaking the Frame: Political Acts of Body in the Televised Dark KnightDT Kofoed
"Mosaic Thresholds": Manifesting the Collection and Production of Comics in the works of Chris WareAaron Mauro
The Beautiful Ambiguity of Blankets: Comics Representation and Religious ArtBenjamin Stevens


"Now you will pay a dreadful penalty!": A Review of I Shall Destroy All the Civilized Planets! and You Shall Die by Your Own Evil Creation! by Fletcher HanksTerry Harpold


Notes on Contributors

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Monday, February 01, 2010

The Use of Sequential Art in Therapy: A Qualitative Study

I received this request over email from Roderick Castle, and I'm posting it here in hopes that some of you might choose to participate. --Gene
I am a graduate student in Art Therapy at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York. My thesis is a qualitative study on the use of "comics" in counseling and education. I would appreciate any help you could provide in getting responses to this short questionnaire on the subject. This study has already been approved by my school's Human Subjects Research Board. Thank you. Here is the link:

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CFP: SANE journal (July and October)

This looks like it could become a very important new journal...
CFP: First and Second issues of
SANE journal:
sequential art narrative in education
(ISSN 2153-2613)

SANE journal
is now seeking submissions for works of research, practitioner-based articles, reviews, and rationales regarding its first two themed issues. Information about this new peer-reviewed, open access interdisciplinary journal covering all things comics-and-education-related, from pre-k to doctorate, can be obtained by visiting For more information, e-mail James Bucky Carter: jbcarter2 at utep dot edu.

V1.1 (late 2010 release or per article as considered ready by review board): “Comics in the Contact Zone.”

Mary Louis Pratt defines the contact zone as “social spaces where cultures meet, clash and grapple with each other, often in the contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power, such as colonialism, slavery, or their aftermaths as they are lived out in many parts of the world today” and where those involved in the educational experience may “reconsider the models of community that many of us rely on in teaching and theorizing and that are under challenge today.” Texts are social spaces, of course, and the comic book may be the best indicator of this fact. How do you see comics as meeting, clashing, and grappling with social issues in your classrooms when you teach them? How do comics illustrate contact zone precepts such as speech acts, transculturation, unsolicited oppositional discourse, autoethnography, and safe houses? How does the integration of comics themselves set up contact zones in the classroom? Which texts do you teach to get at notions associated with contact zone pedagogy? How does teaching a comics course set up a contact zone with professional colleagues, departments, university officials, etc? Articles should make explicit mention to contact zone theory and its component concepts. Deadline July 2010.

V1.2 (planned 2011 released or per article as considered ready by the review board): “Teaching the Works of Alan Moore.”

Alan Moore may be the most influential and controversial comics writer of the 20th and 21st centuries. How do you teach his complex, multilayered works in your high school classrooms, your college courses, etc? What are the challenges associated with teaching his texts or specific texts and how do you and your students address them? Can they be addressed? How does his output “fit” with notions of literature, literary, canon, etc. as you teach them in your courses? Articles may cover several of Moore’s texts or focus specifically on one. Deadline October 2010.

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CFP Reminder: Fractured Images / Broken Words (conference: February 15; June 12)

Note: The organizers of the following conference are still looking for participants!

Fractured Images / Broken Words
A Multi-Disciplinary PostGraduate Symposium

Department of English and Creative Writing
Lancaster University, UK

June 12, 2010

Keynote Speakers:
Professor Terry Eagleton, Lancaster University


Andy Diggle, comic-book writer and former editor of 2000 AD

Featuring art installations by Christine Dawson

Click here for our original post about this conference.

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